What is OTP? Meaning explained

WEBSITES and apps continue to deploy additional security features to keep user information protected and keep unwanted hackers out.

Read on to find out what OTP stands for and why it's an important piece of tech slang to know.

What does OTP stand for?

You may have seen the abbreviation "OTP" while logging into your email client, social media, or online banking account.

The term stands for "one-time password."

If you're logging into an account after a long absence, or if you're using an unfamiliar device, you may receive an OTP sent to your mobile phone number or email.

The OTP is a step in two-factor authentication.

What is two-factor authentication?

Two-factor authentication, also known as two-step authentication or two-step verification, is a means of protecting online accounts.

When you need to log in to a website, you put in your normal password–that's the first "factor" used to authenticate your identity.

Then, a one-time password is sent to your phone or email, and that OTP is used on the next page to access your account.

Instead of an OTP, your login may require you to solve a CAPTCHA or confirm a push notification.

What websites use two-factor authentication?

Plenty of websites already use two-factor authentication.

You've likely encountered it on websites that may store your financial information, like online banking services or shopping websites.

If your doctor's office has a patient portal, your medical information is probably kept safe by two-factor authentication.

Google will be requiring two-step verification for any users who log in to Gmail, Google Drive or other Google services.

A representative told the Wall Street Journal that all Google accounts will be "enrolled" in two-factor authentication before the end of 2022.

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