Princess Anne visits firefighters during her three-day Australia trip

Princess Anne pays a visit to the NSW Rural Fire Service and speaks to families who lost their loved ones during the Black Summer bushfires during her whirlwind three-day trip to Australia

  • Princess Anne, 71, touched down in Australia for official three-day visit 
  • Her trip coincides with the one year anniversary of Prince Philip’s death 
  • The Princess Royal officially opened the Royal Easter Show by early afternoon 
  • Princess Anne opened the show in 1988 during Australia’s bicentenary
  • On Sunday, she visited the New South Wales Rural Fire Service in Sydney
  • She met with families and firefighters  who battled fires over the past two years

Princess Anne has paid a visit to the NSW Rural Fire Service in Sydney after touching down in Australia for a three-day visit on Saturday. 

On Sunday afternoon the Princess Royal met with families of fallen volunteer firefighters Andrew O’Dwyer and Geoffrey Keaton and those who have battled both bushfires and floods in the area over the past three years. 

Mr O’Dwyer, 36, and Mr Keaton, 32, were killed when their truck rolled off the road after hitting a fallen tree in Buxton, south of Sydney, just days before Christmas in December 2019.

She then went onto the Sea Heritage Foundation in Waverton where she was greeted by Ellie McInnes and given a bunch of flowers by a young fan. 

Princess Anne, who is visiting Australia on behalf of her mother Queen Elizabeth II, and her entourage arrived on Saturday and were whisked through the terminal and away by an official police escort.   

Princess Anne has greeted firefighters at the NSW Rural Fire Service in Sydney

On Sunday afternoon the Princess Royal met with families of fallen volunteer firefighter Andrew O’Dwyer

Princess Anne visited the firefighters headquarters after touching down in Australia for a three-day visit on Saturday

She met with those who have battled both bushfires and floods in the area over the past two years

The princess then went onto the Sea Heritage Foundation in Waverton

By the early afternoon she was at Homebush in Sydney’s west to view some of the exhibits ahead of officially opening the 200th anniversary of the popular agricultural show. 

Anne is attending the show in her role as Patron of the Royal Agricultural Society of the Commonwealth.  

The Royal Easter Show capacity has been capped at 80,000, despite there being no Covid restrictions in place.

Anne’s visit also coincides with the first anniversary of the death of her father, Prince Philip, who died at Windsor Castle one year ago today aged 99.

Hers is the first visit to Australia by a member of the British royal family since Harry and Meghan Markle’s rock-star trip in 2018.

The Princess Royal is joined on the trip by her husband, Vice-Admiral Sir Tim Laurence.

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Princess Anne is the first member of the Royal family to visit Australia since Harry and Meghan Markle’s rock-star trip in 2018

Princess Anne views stands at the Bicentennial Sydney Royal Easter Show after arriving in Sydney on Saturday morning

The Queen’s only daughter officially opened the 200th anniversary of the popular agricultural show on Saturday afternoon

The Princess Royal greeted stall-holders after arriving at Sydney’s famous agricultural show

She opened the 1988 show during Australia’s bicentenary celebrations. 

Princess Anne was escorted by the NSW Mounted Police as she made her way into the stadium in a horse-drawn caleche originally built more than 150 years ago to open the show after 5pm on yesterday evening.

The first time it was used it carried Her Majesty the Queen, Prince Phillip, Prince Charles and Princess Anne to the Main Arena where they officially opened the 1970 Show.

The opening of the show by a Royal is a Vice-Regal tradition dating back well over a hundred years.

The opening was followed by an overhead performance by the Air Force Roulettes at 5.30pm. 

Princess Anne was escorted by the NSW Mounted Police as she made her way into the stadium in a horse-drawn caleche originally built more than 150 years ago to open the show shortly after 5pm on Saturday

The 71-year-old royal is know for her love of agricultural issues and horses, competing in a three-day equestrian contest at the 1976 Olympics

Princess Anne previously opened the Royal Easter Show in 1988 during Australia’s bicentenary celebrations

Anne’s visit also coincides with the first anniversary of the death of her father, Prince Philip, who died at Windsor Castle one year ago today aged 99

Anne has several engagements on her whistle-stop three-day visit to Australia, including with the Rural Fire Service and Sea Heritage Foundation

The 71-year-old royal is known for her love of agricultural issues and horses, competing in a three-day equestrian contest at the 1976 Olympics and becoming the first-ever British Royal to become an Olympian.

She is also President of the British Olympic Association.

Anne has several engagements on her whistle-stop three-day visit, including with the Rural Fire Service and Sea Heritage Foundation. 

She is also expected to meet with Margaret Beazley, the Governor of New South Wales, and General David John Hurley, the Governor-General of Australia.

After leaving Australia Princess Anne had engagements in Papua New Guinea.

She is expected to be greeted by PNG Governor General, Sir Bob Dadae and meet Prime Minister James Marape before opening the National Cardiac Diagnostic Centre at the Port Moresby General Hospital and the National Ambulance Control Centre of the St. John Ambulance.

The Princess will also lay a wreath at the Bomana War Cemetery, where 3,284 Commonwealth soldiers are buried, on behalf of the Queen. 

Princess Anne and her husband Timothy Laurence make their way through Sydney airport on Saturday as she begins a three-day royal visit 

Anne’s visit comes exactly one year after the death of her father, Prince Philip, who died on April 9, 2021 aged 99

The show will feature nearly 8,500 animals participating across 12 days, with tens of thousands of other entries in competitions judging everything from rats to roosters and reptiles.

As part of the Royal Agricultural Society of NSW’s 200-year celebrations, there is also a competition for best period-themed young horse riders and pooch owners, featuring costumes from the 1800s.

The show’s General Manager of Agriculture, Murray Wilton, said the event remains true to its roots.

‘We’re doing today what we did 200 years ago but we’re doing it on a much grander scale,’ he said.

‘It all started with a group of farmers who thought that their livestock were better than their neighbours’, and it grew from there.’

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