I had a double mastectomy to remove my boobs – and I'm more confident

‘I’m more confident in my body now’: Woman dubbed the ‘Boobless Babe’ reveals unexpected positives to having breasts removed – including going topless in public

  • Stephanie Germino, from Florida, underwent a double mastectomy
  • The 29-year-old mom revealed becoming ‘boobless’ made her more confident 
  • The mom added she was happier in her body now than she was before 

A 29-year-old woman who underwent a double mastectomy has revealed she is now more confident than she used to be, adding that she goes out in public without a bra and, sometimes, completely topless.

When Stephanie Germino, from Florida, was told there was a mutation in her BRCA1 gene, which meant she had an 87 per cent risk of developing breast cancer, she was shocked.

In a bid to avoid getting the deadly illness, the mom made the brave decision to undergo a double mastectomy, where both breasts were removed, and refused a reconstruction.

Now, the influencer, who boasts more than 1.5 million followers on TikTok as @theebooblessbabe_, is using social media to share her story, raise awareness of the procedure, and detail her new found ‘freedom.’ 

Stephanie Germino (pictured after the surgery), from Florida, underwent a double mastectomy, becoming ‘boobless’ 

The 29-year-old has revealed she is more confident now, adding that she goes out in public without a bra and, sometimes, completely topless (pictured after the surgery)

When Stephanie (pictured before the mastectomy) was told there was a mutation in her BRCA1 gene, which meant she had an 87 per cent risk of developing breast cancer, she was shocked

In a YouTube video published on Shera, a digital platform dedicated to empowering women, the 29-year-old revealed she was much more confident in her skin now than she was before the mastectomy. 

Stephanie revealed the positive aspects of having a double mastectomy, including the ‘freedom’ of not having to wear a bra and going topless in public.

‘I’m 100 per cent more confident in my body now than I was pre-surgery, as I never loved my breasts when I had them,’ the mom told Shera.

‘They weren’t my source of femininity and I do get stares when I’m out topless in public, but nobody has ever come up to me being rude – it’s always positive.’

She explained that she was overjoyed to finally throw out her bras, although it took her some time to get adjusted to her new body. 

‘I absolutely love the fact that I don’t have to wear bras ever again, as there’s something about being bare. It did take me a minute to finally get rid of my bra, but I threw the wire bra out immediately,’ Stephanie said.

‘My sports bra though, that’s more or less what I used on a day-to-day basis.

‘It’s cute, faithful and I questioned whether I should keep it – so I did, as it’s a reminder of the bright side.’ 

Stephanie, who is mom to six-year-old Josiah, claimed she knew from the age of 15 that she was a potential carrier of the mutation due to both her mom and grandmother having the same gene.

She revealed the positive aspects of having a double mastectomy – including the ‘freedom’ of not having to wear a bra and going topless in public (pictured before the surgery)

Stephanie (pictured after the surgery) explained that she was overjoyed to the finally throw out her bras, although it took her some time to get adjusted to her new body

Stephanie, (pictured after the surgery) who is mom to six-year-old Josiah, claimed she knew from the age of 15 that she was a potential carrier of the mutation

Her mom, who also got a preventative double mastectomy in her 40s, had a breast reconstruction afterwards.

But for Stephanie, who underwent the procedure in October 2021 at Tampa General Hospital, Florida, she opted against this due to a range of factors.

‘There are three reasons why I chose not to get one. One being that breast implant illness is a thing and several people I know have suffered from it, so this wasn’t a risk I wanted to take,’ she said.

‘Secondly, implant maintenance every 10 years seems like unnecessary additional surgeries and [finally], I don’t like the way implants look without breast tissue to soften them up.’

Stephanie credited her ability to make the decision without any regrets to her friends and family.

However, she revealed she did receive hate when she decided not to have a reconstruction. 

‘My family and friends were really supportive about the preventative surgery, but I did face pushback when I said I wasn’t having a reconstruction,’ Stephanie said.

‘[Just like them], I also had a surgeon tell me that I would regret it, so I should have a Goldilocks procedure, where they leave extra skin.

Stephanie (pictured after the surgery) credited her ability to make the decision without any regrets to her friends and family

However, she revealed she did receive hate when she decided not to have a reconstruction (pictured after the surgery)

‘If I decided later on to get a reconstruction, then the implants could be inserted – this made me very worried that my wishes weren’t going to be respected. Even before surgery, when I was getting prepped, I kept telling every nurse to make sure I was completely flat. 

‘But when I opened my binder, which is what they put on after surgery to keep the compression running, I saw a left breast on my body.’

Stephanie recalls feeling betrayed and like her ‘worst fear’ had come true, but then discovered it was due to swelling.

Now, she’s taken to social media to raise awareness about the procedure and her decision to refuse a reconstruction – but not everyone had been supportive.

‘I get a lot of hateful and vile comments, it’s scary how ignorant and nasty people can be. It’s crazy how they have no problem showcasing that for the whole world to see,’ Stephanie said.

She revealed many trolls have directed hateful comments towards her because she decided not to have reconstruction surgery.

‘I’ve been told: “You’re definitely a man,” “Where did your milkers go?” and “You’re going to hell.”

‘As well as: “No guy will want you now that you’ve mutilated yourself” and “This generation is f***ed, no one wants to see that.”‘

The mom tries her best to pay no mind to the hurtful comments, adding that she knows in her heart she made the best decision. 

Stephanie (pictured after the surgery) has taken to social media to raise awareness about the procedure and her decision to refuse a reconstruction – but not everyone has been supportive

The mom (pictured after the surgery) tries her best to pay no mind to the hurtful comments, adding that she knows in her heart she made the best decision

‘Breast cancer knows no bounds, men and women of any age can get it. I hope the trolls stop being ignorant before it affects someone they love or themselves,’ she explained.

‘I personally made my choice and I do get a lot of backlash from people on the internet, where people mistake me for being transgender, but I am very confident in my decision.

‘No one can persuade me to do anything that I don’t want to do for my body and how I want it to look.’

Stephanie hopes to raise awareness through sharing her story on social media and despite trolls calling her an “attention seeker,” she believes the message is being heard.

‘People often say I’m doing this for attention and absolutely I am, that’s my mission. But I’m not an attention seeker, I want people to see my story and spread awareness for this disease,’ she added.

‘Unfortunately, we live in a society where we put a lot of emphasis on the way people look. I want women to accept themselves, whether that’s with implants or without.’ 

She explained that she wants others that may be in a similar situation to understand they have resources, and that the choice is their own.  

‘My advice to anyone going through the same situation, is that you’re not alone. Just understand that whatever you choose to do for your body is for you and you must stay strong in that choice,’ Stephanie said.

‘You’re valid and I can’t think of more of a warrior than a woman who has defied the odds and gone against society’s standards.

‘Take a look at your body and love it for getting through the worst case scenario.’

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