HANNAH BETTS on blue eye shadow

HANNAH BETTS on blue eye shadow: Feel the fear of flashes of colour — and do it anyway!

  • So much about remaining current today  is how you accept and reject trends
  • HANNAH BETTS votes ‘yes’ for flashes of colour, which invariably feel au courant
  • Last month’s London Fashion Week added bolts of colour; brows like razored dinosaur-spikes and hair that was not so much glossy as glutinous 

So much about remaining current — and age-defiant — is how you accept and reject trends: knowing who you are, yet being prepared to evolve; embracing change, while fending off the lunatic.

The spring 2022 catwalks featured the following autumn/winter propositions: barely-there foundation; bleached brows; blue eyeshadow; brown lipstick; night beauty (disco-dolly glitter, metallics, crystals, pearls and sequins about eyes); graphic eyeliner plus colour; vinyl, super-shiny lips and deliberately imprecise lids, blush and lips.

Last month’s London Fashion Week added bolts of colour; brows like razored dinosaur-spikes and hair that was not so much glossy as glutinous.

I say vote ‘yes’ for flashes of colour, which invariably feel au courant, and barely-there base which a lot of us older birds favour regardless.

I know, I know, those of us brought up in the 1960s, 70s or 80s may feel a tad queasy about blue — as baby blue 60s dolly-birds morphed into electric blue disco divas. Blue reappeared in the early 2000s by way of frosted shades swept up to our missing-in-action eyebrows (File image)

In your ditch list, I recommend anything actively damaging (conjunctivitis-provoking eye décor, say), or so barkingly unflattering as to provoke outright mirth (dino brows, haphazard slap, glue hair).

Brown lips would be a hard no, if we’re talking that Nineties’, greenish-black incarnation that renders teeth yellow and faces unearthly. Not today, Satan. However, hazel hues do work for many warm-toned women, otherwise why would nude lipsticks prove such a perennial?

Glossier has just launched a new Generation G — its ultra-wearable, poutily pre-blotted lip flush — in Malt, a sensual cinnamon that women are going wild for (£14). While the Parisian choice is Chanel’s limited-edition collection of Rouge Allure nude lipsticks (£35, chanel.com), plus (permanent) Le Vernis Tawny nail lacquers (£25).

Race you to it! 

With the addition of new blue and green pigments, L’Oreal’s fiendishly popular True Match Super Blendable Foundation (£9.99, boots.com) is improving its diversity for those of us with pale, olive, or dark skin. Nine colours join the 48-shade line up, so 99.5 per cent of the world’s women are now catered for. 

True Match Super Blendable Foundation (£9.99, boots.com)

For my money, the most joyous means of high-fiving fashion is a blue eyelid.

I know, I know, those of us brought up in the 1960s, 70s or 80s may feel a tad queasy about blue — as baby blue 60s dolly-birds morphed into electric blue disco divas. Blue reappeared in the early 2000s by way of frosted shades swept up to our missing-in-action eyebrows.

Small wonder make-up rebelled with muddy, Kardashian-style taupes. However, it is these that are now feeling a bit naff, dull and old hat, while blue is undergoing a revival.

I’ve always been a blue broad: as a cool, blue-pink toned type, sapphires bring out the chill of my skin, berry of my lips, the green of my eyes.

That said, to demonstrate how blue can work on warm-complexioned 40-pluses, last autumn the U.S. make-up artist Mary Phillips created a fierce look for 53-year old Jennifer Lopez that demonstrated how stunning the colour can prove when you have bronze and caramel tones.

Feeling intimidated? Start with navy liner, an off-black brilliant at emphasising the whites of mid-life eyes. Victoria Beckham Beauty Satin Kajal Liner in Navy Noir provides a sophisticated, adult take: gliding, comfortable, long-wearing (£22, victoria beckham.com).

From there, cool girls might experiment with Revolution Beauty’s Kohl Eyeliner in Blue (£3, revolution beauty.com), a fantastic forget-me-not; warm tones should opt for Revolution’s Aqua liner (£3), a sludgy teal.

An all-over wash might be the next tentative step. Morphe 2 Jelly Eye Shimmer in Starry Sky (£10, asos.com) is a buildable iridescent gel that can be styled to be as subtle or spectacular as required, setting with no under-eye spillage.

Beyond this, the world is your lobster. Kiko is a great place to play, with its single, bright, Smart-colour Eyeshadows from £4.99 (kikocosmetics.com). Zara’s Eye Shadow Duos are terrific fun, too. Jealous & Jet (£11.99, zara.com) is a cerulean and azure combo, Cyber & Glitch, a satsuma and verdant turquoise.

A swathe of MAC’s Matte Eyeshadow in Cobalt (£17, mac cosmetics.com) looks fabulously fresh, its cornflower aspect divine with emerald eyes. MAC’s Atlantic Blue is no less powerfully peppy: a vivid Klein.

My all-time favourite palette, Bourjois Le Smoky (£5.29, amazon.co.uk), features the greatest glittering indigo to lend interest to a standard smoky eye.

Or you could disco things up by working in Kiko’s New Bright Duo Eyeshadow in Silver & Electric Blue (£8.99). I defy you not to be beguiled.

A soothing cocktail of patchouli, lavender, geranium, frankincense, myrrh and orange. 

An intensely aromatic skin-softener with geranium, lavender and peppermint. 

A subtly scented, de-stressing oil with kelp and plankton. 

Heavenly magnesium-rich Epsom salts, laced with sleep-inducing valerian, lavandin and ylang ylang. 

A few drops in your bath will encourage sleep and alleviate menstrual and menopausal symptoms. 

My icon of the week

Kim Wilde

In the 1980s, the star, on tour at 61, cut and coloured her own hair with Clairol Born Blonde (try Clairol Blonde It Up Permanent High Lift, £5.99, boots.com). These days, she rates Dr Hauschka’s organic wares (drhauschka.co.uk) and never leaves the house without eyebrow pencil and red lipstick. 

Cosmetic craving

A professional took my photograph the other day and very nice it looked too — until I caught sight of my veined and haggard- looking hands. It was with relief, then, that I heard Margaret Dabbs was launching a Pure Overnight Hand Mask (£30) (margaretdabbs.co.uk), its accompanying £10 treatment gloves free with purchase until the end of October. The cream is a lovely, bouncy unguent, rich in buriti oil, turmeric, water-lily and calendula, boosting moisture, collagen and elasticity.

Source: Read Full Article