Five best houseplants to ‘reduce stress’ and ‘help sleep’ – from lavender to spider plants

Houseplants: RHS advises on watering techniques

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Life can be stressful which can make sleeping comfortably more difficult. In fact, searches for “sleep deprivation” have increased 114 percent in the UK in the last 30 days perhaps due to the recent heatwaves and the run up to GCSE results day. However, rather than turning to supplements, Britons could try using plants to sleep better.

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To help ease the pressure, wellness experts at Zeal CBD have discovered five of the best indoor plants to help calm nerves and improve sleep.

Collecting insights over the last 30 days from Google Trends to determine the most-searched-for plant, the experts have provided top tips on how to care for them.

Spider plants

Taking the number one spot, spider plants are the most-searched-for indoor plant to “calm nerves” and “help people sleep”.

The plant has had a search increase of 211 percent in the UK over the last 30 days.

Spider plants help to purify the air and emit oxygen at night, removing any toxins and giving people a more restful sleep.

READ MORE: ‘Keep them away!’ 3 simple tricks to get rid of flies

Spider plants are relatively easy to care for but the “best way” to care for them is by avoiding direct sunlight.

Up to four hours of direct sunlight a day is enough.

The experts added: “The best thing about the plant is it doesn’t take too much attention to flourish!”

Jasmine

This is a gorgeous plant to keep in bedrooms.

The indoor plant has had an increased search of 169 percent over the last 30 days.

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The plant doesn’t only look and smell mice but it helps people rest each night.

The experts explained: “Jasmine includes gamma-aminobutyric acid, a stress reducing ingredient naturally improving your sleep cycle.

“The best way to care for jasmine is by keeping the air cool and circulated.”

Aloe vera

Coming in third place is aloe vera which has had an increased search of 152 percent.

The plant releases oxygen purely at night which makes it the perfect houseplant to keep in a bedroom.

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More oxygen in the air helps to purify it, removing any residues left by cleaning products.

Aloe vera is also really easy to look after as it hardly requires watering.

Allow the plant’s soil to dry out between waterings which is around every three weeks.

Valerian

Often used in herbal teas to calm nerves, searches for the plant have increased by 138 percent in the last 30 days.

Valerian includes many sedative properties such as monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes which result in feeling calm and well-rested.

To keep the plant in the best condition, it’s vital to keep it in full sun during the day.

Lavender

The scent of lavender is believed to help reduce stress and anxiety as it interacts with the neurotransmitters in the brain to stimulate the nervous system “reducing plants to help calm nerves and induce sleep”.

The plant has had an increased search of 128 percent over the last 30 days in the UK.

The expert said: “Lavender is one of the best-smelling as well as stress-reducing plants to help calm nerves and induce sleep.

“It is best to ensure you are giving the plant as much light as possible.”

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