Noel Clarke 'told producers to "fix" lack of diversity' on new project

‘The crew’s not diverse enough’: Kidulthood star Noel Clarke reveals how he demanded producers ‘fix’ the make-up of crew on first day of shooting new ITV project

Kidulthood star Noel Clarke revealed how he demanded producers ‘fix’ the lack of diversity on ‘day one’ of shooting a new TV project. 

Speaking at the Edinburgh TV Festival, the actor said he immediately called in producers and insisted upon quick action. 

‘I don’t care if there’s trainees, because this job’s trainees is the next job’s runner, then the next job’s assistant, then they’re a supervisor, then in five year’s time or three year’s time, we have more people in the business from different backgrounds; socio-economic, not just about colour.’

All-star cast: Noel Clarke and Hollyoaks actress Bronagh Waugh are starring in a gritty new police show Viewpoint

The Kidulthood star has regularly spoken out about racism and previously claimed many TV channels refused to back his hit Sky One show Bulletproof because it was led by two black actors. 

Mr Clarke and Hollyoaks actress Bronagh Waugh will be starring together in Viewpoint – the first ITV drama to begin filming since the coronavirus pandemic.

The programme, which is headed up by Fleabag director Harry Bradbeer, follows a tense police surveillance investigation into a close Manchester community.

Filming has already started in Manchester and on Wednesday a dramatic fight scene took place on the city streets.

Dramatic: Headed up by Fleabag director Harry Bradbeer, follows a tense police surveillance investigation into a close Manchester community

Mr Clarke and Bronagh Waugh (pictured in Hollyoaks) will be starring together in Viewpoint – the first ITV drama to begin filming since the coronavirus pandemic

Gritty: In the fight scene filmed on Wednesday, actor Dominic Allburn was seen wearing a mask and swinging punches

Finnish conductor of the Proms ‘did NOT axe Rule Britannia’ 

A Finnish conductor caught up in a row over the Last Night of the Proms is not responsible for axing Rule Britannia and would never have been ‘arrogant’ enough to suggest it, her friends say. 

BBC sources had reportedly claimed Dalia Stasevska, 35, demanded the patriotic anthem, along with Land of Hope and Glory, be pulled from the performance due to their links to British imperialism. 

But friends last night insisted that BBC bosses made the decision to not have the songs sung, adding that Ms Stasevska would not have had the ‘arrogance’ to insist on such a change. 

A source close to Ms Stasevska told The Telegraph: ‘From Dalia’s point of view there has been a lot of unpleasantness and some of the stuff that has been written is heart-breaking.

‘It is frightening, unpleasant, scary stuff and she can’t say anything as she can’t be a part of any of that.’ 

Doctor Who star Noel, 44, DC Martin King in the all-star cast, which also includes Black Mirror’s Alexandra Roach and Coronation Street’s Catherine Tyldesley.

The five-part series will explore the nature of surveillance and whether police can observe a community with objectivity and without an effect.

In the show, DC Martin King sets up his observation post in the home of single mother and secret voyeur, Zoe Sterling, played by Alexandra Roach. 

Zoe’s windows look on to Westbury Square and the home of missing primary school teacher Gemma Hillman, played by Tutenkhamun star Amy Wren.

She shares the home with boyfriend and prime suspect in her disappearance, Greg Sullivan, played by I May Destroy You actor Fehinti Balogun.

The series is based on an idea by Emmy award-winning director Harry Bradbeer and written with Silent Witness creator Ed Whitmore.

Other stars in the series include EastEnders’s Shannon Murray, Poldark’s Phil Davis, Broadchurch actor Marcus Garvey and Catastrophe’s Sarah Niles.   

Executive Producer Lucy Bedford said: ‘Harry and Ed have crafted a compelling, tense, claustrophobic thriller that turns the spotlight on the observer rather than the observed. 

‘With the incredible Noel Clarke and Alexandra Roach leading the cast, we are extremely excited to be back in production.’   

Safety: Bronagh was seen wearing a rainbow mask during filming on Wednesday on the streets of Manchester

Fresh BBC race row as Jamaica’s foreign minister complains over Famalam sketch showing Caribbean men leering at women and high on cannabis on Countdown

  • Kamina Johnson-Smith branded the BBC Three show ‘outrageous and offensive’
  • The episode sees a male host stare at female character and pretend to have sex
  • It also features a panellist high on marijuana, who forgets an answer to question
  • The BBC is already under fire over lyrics in two songs in Last Night of the Proms

The BBC is involved in a fresh race row as Jamaica’s foreign minister complains over a Famalam sketch showing Caribbean men leering at women and high on cannabis.

Kamina Johnson-Smith branded the BBC Three clip, which created a Jamaican version of Channel 4 show Countdown, ‘outrageous and offensive’.

The episode sees a male host stare at a character playing maths boffin Rachel Riley, before he pretends to have sex with her.

It also features a panellist high on marijuana, who forgets an answer to a question, and plays on the stereotype that black men are well endowed.

The BBC is already under fire after deciding to play Land of Hope and Glory and Rule Britannia without lyrics at the Last Night of the Proms.

Kamina Johnson-Smith branded the BBC Three show (pictured), which created a Jamaican version of Channel 4 show Countdown, ‘outrageous and offensive’

Ms Johnson-Smith tweeted: ‘This is outrageous and offensive to the incredible country which I am proud to represent along with every Jamaican at home and within our #Diaspora. I will immediately be writing formally on this! #StopThisShow.’

She was replying to a tweet from entrepreneur Nathaniel Peat, who wrote: ‘As the Global Jamaica Diaspora Counsel Rep for South UK @bbcthree the Jamaican community in the UK have expressed serious concerns at how offensive the content in this show is.

‘This doesn’t reflect our culture well Nd many are upset. @Ofcom @kaminajsmith @mfaftja.’

But the BBC defended Famalm, with channel controller Fiona Campbell saying it was not ‘malicious’, adding: ‘We stand by the creator’s brand of humour.’

She told the Edinburgh TV Festival: ‘Famalam is now in its third series and it is very successful.

‘It is not malicious humour and I think if you followed on social, the creators themselves said they are poking fun at all stereotypes.

‘There isn’t malice in the type of content.’

White BBC comedy chief Shane Allen added: ‘Don’t diss my beloved Famalam. If you are going to do something about tricky topics it needs to be from those communities, from those people who’ve got that voice.’

A BBC spokesman said: ‘Famalam… now in its third series, has an established brand of humour in line with audience expectations and is well known for confronting issues.’

Jamaica’s Minister for Foreign Affairs and Trade Kamina Johnson Smith speaks during the 72nd session of the United Nations General Assembly at the United Nations in New York in 2007

The broadcast announced it would play Land of Hope and Glory and Rule Britannia without lyrics at the Last Night of the Proms due to an association with colonialism.

It said ‘new orchestral versions’ of the hugely popular anthems would feature in the rousing finale of its concert next month.

Neither will be sung even though a soprano will perform the National Anthem, Jerusalem and You’ll Never Walk Alone.

The songs are part of the last night’s finale, when thousands of flagwaving ‘prommers’ traditionally pack the Royal Albert Hall.

But critics claim the lyrics to Rule Britannia, including the line ‘Britons never, never, never shall be slaves’, are overtly racist given the UK’s role in the slave trade.

The 1902 lyrics of Land of Hope and Glory were reputedly inspired by Cecil Rhodes, an imperialist whose statue is being removed from an Oxford college.

The broadcast announced it would play Land of Hope and Glory and Rule Britannia without lyrics at the Last Night of the Proms due to an association with colonialism. Pictured: Jamie Barton waving the the rainbow flag at the Last Night of the Proms at the Royal Albert Hall in London last year, while singing Rule Britannia

It was reported at the weekend the conductor for this year’s Last Night, Dalia Stasevska of Finland, was keen to reduce the patriotic elements of the event.

This year, without an audience, was seen as the perfect moment to bring about change.

It led to a huge backlash, with even the Prime Minister and Culture Secretary Oliver Dowden getting involved.

In a bid to defuse the row, BBC bosses finally announced the Last Night on September 12 would still feature ‘familiar, patriotic elements’.

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