Famed Nova Scotia treasure hunter did it his way, minister tells funeral

An American man who dedicated his life to finding treasure on Nova Scotia’s Oak Island was remembered Monday as a larger-than-life figure who became a pillar in the community he made home for more than 50 years.

Roughly 120 people packed a small wood-panelled church in the coastal community of Martins Point for the funeral of Dan Blankenship.

Blankenship, a U.S. Army veteran who became fixated on the Oak Island mystery, died March 17 at age 95.

The service included a rendition of Frank Sinatra’s “My Way.”

“He enjoyed his life,” said Rev. Ron Barkhouse of St. Mark’s Anglican Church, where Blankenship would often attend services.

“He had 95 years to do what he wanted to do.”

Blankenship was a staple on “The Curse of Oak Island,” a reality TV series on the History channel set on the 57-hectare island on Nova Scotia’s south shore.

David Eisnor, a longtime family friend, said during a eulogy that Blankenship was known around the world for being a treasure hunting legend, but he had many interests.

Eisnor said his resume would also include “scuba diver, fisherman, armchair quarterback for his love of football, dancer and singer.”

Blankenship became hooked on the story of Oak Island after reading a “Reader’s Digest” story in 1965 at his Florida home.

Eisnor said at the time, Blankenship asked his wife Jane to read the piece, hoping it would also pique her interest.

“She handed it back to him and said, ‘So what?”‘ said Eisnor, sparking a few laughs from the crowd.

“Dan said to her, ‘Well number one, there’s treasure on Oak Island, and number two, I’m going to find it.’

“It’s a statement like that, in a nutshell, that summed up Dan’s unbridled determination for everything that he did.”

Blankenship co-owned the island with a group of investors, including brothers Rick and Marty Lagina, who are doing the major work on site now. Their search for treasure has been featured during the reality TV show’s six seasons.

The Oak Island legend began in 1795 when curious teenage boys began digging at the site, thinking they might find a pirate’s buried treasure. Theories on who may have buried treasure on the island range from pirate Blackbeard to the Knights Templar.

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